Roadtripping around the South Island of New Zealand with Mad Campers NZ

Meandering down windy roads with each turn giving us a glimpse of staggering peaks and breathtaking fjords was a routine that was easy to get used to as Caroline and I spent a week roadtripping around New Zealand in a Mad Campers NZ van.

One of the first things I learned upon arrival in New Zealand is how quickly the weather can change. While it’s a good idea to have some hikes in mind, it’s important to realize that sticking to a firm schedule likely won’t work out. We had a list of ideas and adjusted our schedule day-by-day based on the weather. Our Mad Campers NZ van gave us the flexibility to keep our plans loose and take full advantage of the good weather when it came. No pre-booked hotels, nothing holding us to a certain place at a certain time – we drove the van around and slept wherever it ended up being convenient. New Zealand is full of “holiday parks” where you can sleep in your van, so van life is quite easy.

Hike Outside of Queenstown

Our first overnight hike (which I promised not to disclose the location of) was a few hours outside of Queenstown. Five hours of slogging through mud and climbing over fallen trees led us to a peaceful river where we set up camp. The next morning we hiked up the river to the glacier for some absolutely stunning views. The hike ended up taking much longer than we anticipated and we didn’t get out until around 10pm. We were SO excited to be back at the van. We immediately cooked ourselves a nice dinner, drove to the nearest holiday park with availability, set up our bed in the van, and went to sleep. It was cold outside, but the van was nice and warm. My tired and sore body really appreciated the padding of the bed.

A Couple of Days of Relaxation

After our first hike, the weather turned bad and it rained for two days straight. We took advantage of the downtime to catch up on work, edit photos, and let our bodies recharge. Sometimes we ate at cafes and sometimes we cooked in the van. And let me tell you, sleeping in a van is soooo much nicer than sleeping in a tent when it’s raining!

Mitre Peak

When the weather got nice again, we drove down to Milford Sound. After taking a few photos at the sound, we got on a Milford Helicopters flight to the foothill of Mitre Peak. We camped there that night and woke up to a beautiful sunrise. We hiked the rest of the morning and got picked up that afternoon. Mitre Peak is a beautiful mountain that rises directly out of the ocean. It is peaceful and not heavily trafficked, so you’re likely to have the mountain all to yourself. Be careful if you hike – it’s easy to get lost near the bottom and it’s very exposed.

Gertrude Saddle

Gertrude Saddle has gotten extremely popular in the last few years – and for good reason. It’s a fun hike with gorgeous sunrises and sunsets. The hike is about 8.6 miles out and back and took me 5.5 hours with an overnight backpack and sprained ankle. The beginning of the hike is through some trees, but the remainder follows a river/river bed until a short scramble and then a boulder field before reaching the saddle. The trail is fairly well marked, though I did get briefly lost coming out of the trees on the way back. I’d recommend downloading the AllTrails map just in case. The beginning of the hike is basically walking over loose rocks, so if you have a bad ankle like I do, be careful! The scramble section has cables, so it’s fairly easy even if you aren’t comfortable on rocks. The boulder field is well marked with cairns and markers and if you follow them, it’s not bad. While Gertrude Saddle is very safe on a dry day, people have died when the weather has been bad. Numerous signs along the trail warn hikers of the danger. Do not attempt Gertrude if it has been raining! We were the only campers the night we stayed at Gertrude Saddle. It was peaceful, but very windy and cold! Be prepared if you plan to camp.

Why I Loved Traveling in the Mad Campers NZ Van

Our van was the perfect little home for our weeklong road trip. It was a great combination of convenience and comfort. We had the flexibility to travel as we pleased, but always had a comfortable warm bed, a mini kitchen, running water, and even a bathroom. I wouldn’t travel around New Zealand any other way!

How I manage to travel while maintaining a demanding job

One of the most frequent questions I am asked by people I’m friends with on social media but am not close with is: Do you work? Ha. Well, yes, in fact, I do work. Actually, I work at large corporate law firm. And to put it lightly, biglaw isn’t really known for its flexibility. Despite the fact that I’m not gone as often as I seem to be and I work pretty crazy hours when I am home, I do think I manage to pull off having a bit more flexibility than the average biglaw associate.

Once people realize that I have a demanding job, they typically ask how I balance my job with travel. First let me put out a disclaimer: I know I saw this all the time, but really – I post a lot of old pictures. I usually take short trips (I just take a ton of pictures and continue to post them for long after I have gotten home). And when I’m home, I often work weekends and late nights. Having gotten that out of the way, although there is no one correct strategy to living life while maintaining a demanding job, here are a few pointers I have:

  • If you want your job to be flexible with you, be flexible with your job. The partners I work for give me a larger degree of flexibility because they know how hard I work. When we have had deadlines approaching, I have spent entire weeks working past midnight, sometimes until as late as 4am…and then showing up by 10am for the next workday. Because of this, when I ask for some time off, my partners are more flexible with me.
  • Get comfortable with last minute planning…and last minute canceling.¬†Most demanding jobs are unpredictable, which makes planning a vacation 5 months in advance a little bit difficult. For long vacations like South America and Asia, I generally do plan months in advance and communicate my plans as soon as I make them so my bosses have plenty of time to prepare for me to be out. However, by far the vast majority of my travel is made up of shorter (generally weekend or weekend plus a day) trips. I need to be available on weekends when client work demands it, so sometimes I end up doing work from my hotel room and my vacation turns into less of a vacation. Oh well. I have gotten on a flight on a Friday, landed for a layover, read an email that I needed to be at work Saturday morning, and gotten on the next flight back home, without ever having made it to my destination. And guess what – I didn’t say a single word about it to my bosses. No matter how safe I try to be in my planning, inevitably things will come up and I will need to cancel trips. It’s unfortunate and I lose money every time, but I’ve decided that it’s worth it.
  • Shorter trips are the way to go. Do I enjoy spending 10 hours on a plane to spend 2 days on the west coast? Not really. I would much rather spend 4 or 5 days in a place that I’m flying across the country to be in. But I can’t have it all my way. I try to pack as many things as possible into very short trips. Usually I do pretty well ūüôā

Life Lessons from Traveling Alone for 6 Weeks

Six weeks ago, I boarded a plane to Iceland without a return ticket. ¬†The preceding year had been a difficult one in terms of career-related stress. ¬†It was my last year of law school. ¬†I took 19 credits my last semester, the maximum allowed by the American Bar Association. ¬†I also worked full time at a large law firm. ¬†It was the first time my law school had allowed this. ¬†Previously, full time students (12 or more credits) were not permitted to work more than 20 hours a week. ¬†I often worked more than 40. ¬†On top of that, I was studying for the Virginia Bar Exam. ¬†During this whole time, I was not as financially comfortable as I was accustomed to being. ¬†Prior to attending law school, I had a career as a consultant. ¬†I had to sacrifice my salary for a much lower paycheck…and the same mortgage, car payment and other bills. ¬†So what did I do? ¬†Rather than adjust my lifestyle, I chose to work more. ¬†I turned to Instagram advertising and beer/liquor promotions. ¬†Which brought even more stress. ¬†I’m good at suppressing stress and just pushing through it, so I don’t think I even realized how stressed I was at the time. ¬†However, in hindsight, it had been affecting my health, my relationships, my work ethic, and my personality. ¬†I just wasn’t myself.

And so I left on this adventure. ¬†I wasn’t sure exactly what the next weeks would bring, how long I would be gone, or what I would do. ¬†I had been so consumed with working and studying that I neglected to do any real planning. ¬†I did had plans to meet up with friends in various places. ¬†Well, things never go as planned, now do they? ¬†I spent five days in Iceland with my friend, but ended up spending the remainder of my trip alone.


Despite this change in the only plans I had made, I ended up having the best six weeks of my entire life. ¬†I’ve never learned so much about myself and the world we live in, reached such a high level of self-awareness, or felt so genuinely happy. ¬†I could try to explain the experiences I had and the things I felt, by my writing could never do them justice. ¬†No words could adequately describe the feeling of despair I felt as I was lost in Norwegian fjords in the middle of the night, followed by a great appreciation for the beauty of nature when I unexpectedly saw the northern lights as I was searching for my way, and finally a feeling of satisfaction and confidence after I spent all night hiking in the dark and finally found my way back to the parking lot. ¬†Or the feeling of awe I felt as I wandered through the tundra in Greenland with no real destination and no other humans in sight. ¬†Or the connection I had with Greenlandic sled dogs as I pet and played with them for hours every day (warning – these dogs can be vicious, and I wouldn’t recommend running up and petting them). ¬†I can’t explain what happened. ¬†I can’t adequately describe my experiences. ¬†But maybe I can describe how I changed.

Accepting Things for What they Are, How They Are

I used to get really bothered when things weren’t the way I wanted them to be. ¬†I’ve never been one to give up easily, and I took that to an extreme. ¬†I would obsess over everything that wasn’t perfect or the way I wanted it to be. ¬†I would expend endless amounts of energy trying to fix things. ¬†At a certain point over the last six weeks, I stopped caring as much as I did before…in a good way. ¬†I can accept things for what they are now. ¬†Several things that had been really bothering me before I left are no longer the issues they were before. ¬†I am either content or only slightly annoyed with them now. ¬†I no longer obsessively try to fix them. ¬†I’m so much happier like this.

Knowing Which Relationships Matter

I am so much more comfortable with who is in ¬†my life now – and who is not. ¬†I’ve realized that I now have some of the most genuine, good-hearted friends I could ask for. ¬†I know that I have people who care about me and would be there no matter what. ¬†I appreciate these people more than I did before. ¬†Before I left, there were people I missed because they are no longer in my life. ¬†Now, I see why they are gone, and I know it is for the best. ¬†A couple of them have contacted me while I was away. ¬†The interest I previously would have had in reconnected with them is gone now. ¬†I had an ex reach out in the last week of my trip and say he wanted to see me and see how things went. ¬†Before I left, I would have absolutely agreed to this. ¬†Now, I know that he is nothing that I want. ¬†I’ve realized that his interests in designer clothes and eating at the most expensive restaurants just don’t mesh with my far more laid back lifestyle. ¬†He cares way too much about what other people think, and these days, I want nothing to do with that.

Understanding Myself

Spending so much time alone has led to a much deeper relationship with myself. ¬†When there’s no one else around, you get to know yourself in a way you didn’t before. ¬†You are your only company and while your good qualities shine, your flaws come out and stare you in the face like never before. ¬†I felt this particularly in Greenland, where I had limited access to wifi, and therefore limited communication with my friends and family. ¬†I was my only company, and this made it pretty difficult to ignore my flaws. ¬†But self-awareness leads to self-improvement and this alone time has helped make me a better person.

Knowing What I Want

Part of getting to know myself better has been learning what I¬†really¬†want. ¬†Sure, we all know generally what we want in life, but I now know what matters the most and what my priorities are. ¬†I’ve thought about my career. ¬†Although it is stressful at times, I love what I do and I need the mental challenge in my life. ¬†However, I also love the mountains and being outdoors. ¬†Although it is the idea location for my career, I’m not sure how much longer I can be in DC. ¬†Life is all about balance, and I’m working on finding the balance between a satisfying career and being where I want to be. ¬†I know what goals I have for myself. ¬†I want a successful legal career. ¬†I also want to climb mountains and travel the world. ¬†I’m not sure how well the two fit together, but I’m going to do my best.

Finding Happiness

I think I’ve always been a relatively happy person. ¬†I have a great life, and I certainly recognize that. ¬†However, before I left, stress was consuming me. ¬†I wasn’t relaxed enough to enjoy the great life I had. ¬†All of that changed. ¬†With every hike, my stress faded. ¬†I saw new places, met new people, and learned more about the world. ¬†I developed a new mindset and appreciation for life and the beauty of the world. ¬†I feel extremely grateful for the amazing life I live and I’ve never been so happy.

I spent a lot of times on trains my last few days, slowly making my way back home. ¬†I did a lot of reflecting on my time away. ¬†I found myself smiling at the memories I made. ¬†I found myself crying tears of sadness that this amazing adventure is over. ¬†But I also found myself crying tears of joy that I’ve been so fortunate to¬†experience life so well.

Six weeks may not seem like a long time, but everything feels different.  I left with a clear head, better relationship with myself, and greater awareness.  Most importantly, I discovered a deeper sense of true happiness.

Don’t Listen to Generic Advice. Do What’s Right for You.

In my last post, I wrote about how I balance a demanding job with my lifestyle. ¬†In this post, I’ll explain why I choose to do that, and encourage you to live life your way.

I’ve read countless articles encouraging people to quit their jobs and travel the world. ¬†To not worry about bills or jobs…and let those things “work themselves out”. ¬†I’ve seen that mentality work for many people. ¬†However, there is no cookie-cutter answer, and this approach can be horribly wrong for many other people, myself included.

I could never drop everything to travel. ¬†There is nothing wrong with doing so, but it just couldn’t work for me. ¬†First of all, I have career ambitions. ¬†Second, I need the mental challenges that come with a demanding job. ¬†And third, my lifestyle simply wouldn’t be possible if I sacrificed my professional income.

First, I am an extremely ambitious person, with life goals that include both adventures and career achievements. ¬†I can’t prioritize one of these over the other because they are both important to me. ¬†If I dropped my professional career to have adventures, I would never meet my career goals. ¬†Unfortunately, law isn’t one of those professions that you can just leave for a few years and come back to.

Second, I enjoy intellectual challenges. ¬†I love that my job provides me with mental stimulation and I am constantly learning. ¬†Don’t get me wrong, there is plenty to be learned from experiencing the world…but this is a different kind of knowledge. ¬†I’m not saying that it’s less valuable or less important, but it is different, and it would not satisfy me.

Third, while I definitely enjoy camping, have no problem taking an overnight bus in South America, and can totally bum it in a hostel for a few nights, I must admit that I enjoy the finer things in life. ¬†I own a condo in a nice area, I drive a relatively nice car, and I have a bit of a Starbucks addiction. ¬†I’ve also just never been one of those people who is good at budgeting. ¬†I would much rather find a way to make additional money doing odd jobs and afford the lifestyle I want than to cut corners and not live the lifestyle I want.

All of these things¬†mean¬†I need to maintain my professional job. ¬†It’s right for me, and that’s okay. ¬†I will still continue to have adventures and explore the world when I can. ¬†It may not be as often as it would be if I followed the now-popular advice to “drop everything and see the world while you’re young”, but it will still happen.

At the end of the day, you need to do what is right for you.  Mainstream advice that oversimplifies things may not be the right answer.  Think about your own life, your goals, and your priorities.  Then make your life decisions accordingly.

 

How I manage to travel while maintaining a demanding job

One of the most frequent questions I am asked by people I’m friends with on social media but am not close with is: Do you work? Ha. Well, yes, in fact, I do work. Actually, I work at large corporate law firm. And to put it lightly, biglaw isn’t really known for its flexibility. Despite the fact that I’m not gone as often as I seem to be and I work pretty crazy hours when I am home, I do think I manage to pull off having a bit more flexibility than the average biglaw associate.

Once people realize that I have a demanding job, they typically ask how I balance my job with travel. First let me put out a disclaimer: I know I saw this all the time, but really – I post a lot of old pictures. I usually take short trips (I just take a ton of pictures and continue to post them for long after I have gotten home). And when I’m home, I often work weekends and late nights. Having gotten that out of the way, although there is no one correct strategy to living life while maintaining a demanding job, here are a few pointers I have:

  • If you want your job to be flexible with you, be flexible with your job. The partners I work for give me a larger degree of flexibility because they know how hard I work. I am usually the first person in the office and the last person to leave the office. When we have had deadlines approaching, I have spent entire weeks working past midnight, sometimes until as late as 4am…and then showing up by 10am for the next workday. Because of this, when I ask for some time off, my partners are more flexible with me.
  • Get comfortable with last minute planning…and last minute canceling.¬†Most demanding jobs are unpredictable, which makes planning a vacation 5 months in advance a little bit difficult. For long vacations like South America and Asia, I generally do plan months in advance and communicate my plans as soon as I make them so my bosses have plenty of time to prepare for me to be out. However, by far the vast majority of my travel is made up of shorter (generally weekend or weekend plus a day) trips. Because I work in biglaw, I need to be available on weekends when client work demands it, so I can’t just plan to be away every weekend either. Usually, I plan my vacations at the last minute. If it’s Friday, and I know I won’t need to work over the weekend, I will usually take a road trip somewhere. If I know I’ll have the weekend off a little earlier in the week, I may book a flight somewhere. Usually this works out for me, but not always. I have gotten on a flight on a Friday, landed for a layover, read an email that I needed to be at work Saturday morning, and gotten on the next flight back home, without ever having made it to my destination. And guess what – I didn’t say a single word about it to my bosses. No matter how safe I try to be in my planning, inevitably things will come up and I will need to cancel trips. It’s unfortunate and I lose money every time, but I’ve decided that it’s worth it.
  • Shorter trips are the way to go. Do I enjoy spending 10 hours on a plane to spend 2 days on the west coast? Not really. I would much rather spend 4 or 5 days in a place that I’m flying across the country to be in. But I can’t have it all my way. I try to pack as many things as possible into very short trips. Usually I do pretty well ūüôā While they certainly aren’t ideal, I’ve learned to accomplish a lot and really enjoy short trips.

Having said all of that, why do I have a demanding job? Read more about that decision in my next post.